Ousted Egyptian president Morsi dies in court

Ousted Egyptian president Morsi dies in court

June 17, 2019– Mary Greeley News – Egypt’s former President Mohammed Morsi, who was ousted by the army in 2013, has died after fainting in a courtroom, state TV says.

“He was speaking before the judge for 20 minutes, then became very animated and fainted. He was quickly rushed to the hospital where he later died,” a judicial source says.

The official Al-Ahram news website also reported the death of Morsi, who was Egypt’s first democratically elected president, but spent just one turbulent year in office after the 2011 uprising before the army toppled him in July 2013.

A former top figure in the now-banned Islamist movement Muslim Brotherhood, Morsi was in court for a hearing on charges of espionage. He was 67.

Morsi was overthrown following mass protests a year after he took office as the country’s first democratically elected leader.

He had remained in custody since then.

After his removal from power, Egyptian authorities launched a crackdown on his supporters and the Muslim Brotherhood.

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State television said Morsi, who was 67, was in court for a hearing on charges of espionage emanating from suspected contacts with the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas.

Morsi was serving a 20-year prison sentence for a conviction arising from the killing of protesters during demonstrations in 2012 and a life sentence for espionage in a case related to the Gulf state of Qatar.

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The hearing in the capital, Cairo, was related to charges of espionage emanating from suspected contacts with the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, according to state television.

Ousted Egyptian president Morsi dies in court

Who was Morsi?

Morsi was born in the village of El-Adwah in the Nile Delta province of Sharqiya in 1951. He studied Engineering at Cairo University in the 1970s before moving to the US to complete a PhD.

He was chosen as the Muslim Brotherhood’s presidential candidate for the 2012 election after the movement’s preferred choice was forced to pull out. After a narrow victory, he promised to head a government “for all Egyptians”.

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But critics complained he had failed to deliver during his turbulent year in office. They accused him of allowing Islamists to monopolise the political scene and mishandling the economy.

Public opposition to his government grew and millions of anti-government protesters took to the streets across Egypt to mark the first anniversary of the day he took office, on 30 June 2013.

On the evening of 3 July, the army suspended the constitution and announced the formation of a technocratic interim government ahead of new presidential elections. Morsi, who denounced the announcement as a coup, was taken into custody by the army.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday pays tribute to former Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, who died in a Cairo hospital after fainting during a court session, calling him a “martyr.”

“May Allah rest our Morsi brother, our martyr’s soul in peace,” says Erdogan, who had forged close ties with Morsi.

The Arab Spring—or what was left of it—ended with a massacre. There were only two countries with largely peaceful democratic transitions. One of them was Tunisia; one of them was Egypt, the Arab world’s most populous nation and a bellwether for the region. On August 14, 2013, six weeks after a military coup against the Muslim Brotherhood-led government, over 800 people were killed near Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. It was the worst mass killing in modern Egyptian history.

Mary Greeley News
www.marygreeley.com

credit: In part with https://www.timesofisrael.com/liveblog-june-17-2019/