Galapagos Islands volcano eruption: La Cumbre spews lava and gas – wildlife under THREAT

Galapagos Islands volcano eruption: La Cumbre spews lava and gas - wildlife under THREAT

A volcano on the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador has erupted, spewing lava into the sea as well as gas and smoke up to three kilometers into the sky.

The erupting volcano on the island of Fernandina has been confirmed by the Galapagos National Park, which has said the activity endangers nearby wildlife.

Galapagos Islands volcano eruption: La Cumbre spews lava and gas - wildlife under THREAT

Cameras have captured clouds of gas and smoke, and magmatic material coming from the volcano.

According to the Geophysical Institute of the National Polytechnic School, the eruption, which occurred on the northeastern sector of the volcano, was followed by a series of nine earthquakes ranging from 2.5-megnitude to 4.1-magnitude.

Galapagos Islands volcano eruption: La Cumbre spews lava and gas - wildlife under THREAT

A statement from Galapagos National Park Director Jorge Carrion confirmed there are no human settlements in that area of the archipelago where the eruption has taken place, adding there has so far been no evidence of ash emission or plans to evacuate the animals.

Galapagos Islands volcano eruption: La Cumbre spews lava and gas - wildlife under THREAT

Director Jorge Carrion said: “There are some species that could be affected, however, being a flow (of lava) that is in only one direction, on only one side of the island, the possible impacts that there would be would not have a significant impact on biodiversity.

Galapagos Islands volcano eruption: La Cumbre spews lava and gas - wildlife under THREAT

“This is a natural process with which the species that inhabit that island have lived together throughout their lives and it would be wrong for us to intervene in these processes.”

The volcano last erupted on September 4, 2017 and came after eight years of relative calm before it began spewing potentially damaging gases up to four kilometers into the sky.

La Cumbre, which is 4,852 feet high, began erupting in April 2009 and is the most active volcano on the Galapagos Islands.

It is described as a ‘shield volcano ‘, which is a type of volcano that is usually relatively flat and composed almost entirely of fluid lava flows.

Lava travels further than the deadly fluid erupting from a stratovolcano, and results in the gradual accumulation of broad sheets of lava.




A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano, is one built up of many layers of hardened lava and ash, characterized by its steepness with a summit crater and periodic levels of explosive and effusive eruptions.

Lava from these volcanos typically cools and hardens before spreading far.

La Cumbre is the latest volcano to erupt, following Kilauea on Hawaii and Fuego on Guatemala.

Kilauea has been erupting since the start of May and on Saturday explosions of ash continued to belch from the volcano, causing “heavy fog to blanket the interior and southern parts” of the Big Island.

Lava coming from fissure eight is estimated to be moving 21 MPH.

Officials are also growing increasingly concerned about the decreasing air quality, warning vog is being swept long larger swathes of the island.

Vog carries life-threatening sulphur dioxide that can penetrate the skin, tissues and membranes of the body, causing breathing difficulties and potentially inducing symptoms of asthma.

According to the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency, the latest explosions on Saturday evening “produced an ash plume that rose up to 10,000 feet and dispersed”.

Winds have carried the volcanic smog for thousands of miles westward, reaching as far away as the western Pacific island of Guam.

Laze, a hazard steam cloud formed when lava hits seawater, is also creating air quality concerns.





Mary Greeley News
www.marygreeley.com

credit: https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/975433/Galapagos-Islands-volcano-eruption-La-Cumbre-Ecuador-Fernandina-latest-update